Featured Image
20120228

Author: Jess Rothenberg Published: February 21st 2012 by Penguin Young...

Author: Jess Rothenberg
Published: February 21st 2012 by Penguin Young Readers Group
Rating:

I completely agree when Lauren Oliver described this book as gorgeous, funny and heartbreaking. Because The Catastrophic History of You and Me by Jess Rothenberg is all that…and more.

Well, you read the blurb right? Yes, she died from heartbreak. I mean literally. Nope, not kidding here, after her boyfriend said that he didn’t love her—as she described the four worst words in the English language. She collapsed; her heart broke in half and died. It sucks that she didn’t even get the chance to turn ‘sweet’ sixteen. It’s really the wrong time to die. But now that she’s D and G (dead and gone) she found herself in a place abundant in pizza, with an old lady who loves crossword puzzles (who btw insist that we use pencil when solving), kid who plays too much video games…and yeah some Lady Gothga…I think. Plus, a guy who called himself ‘the resident lost soul’ named Patrick. With all these crazies, what afterlife has in store for her?

This book was different from what I expected. Different in a good way. You don’t know how much fun I have reading this book. Who could have thought that an afterlife of a fifteen year old girl could be this hilarious but definitely insightful? Not me. So I was pleasantly surprised to have enjoyed this book. Admittedly though, it wasn’t really that original. I have read books, movie that deals with the same theme that also delivered in the same fashion. But I can’t deny the book’s knack for entertainment. Because it entertained me from page one to the last.

I’m avoiding spilling more beans, because I don’t want to mess it for you peeps. As much as I wanted to tell you how significant Patrick character is, I’ll just gonna shut up. I swooned, I laughed—like a lot, and towards the end he made me cry. This guy is unbelievable. (Loved the cheese joke btw) But the star of this book is none other than Brie. I loved how she narrated her story—her catastrophic history…plus her important guy. What I find incredibly ironic but amusingly refreshing is that Brie experienced the five stages of grief when she’s already dead. People who experience this are those who are about to die. Not people who already died. But in her defense, her death was untimely. So I guess it was reasonable. Haha, who cares anyway?

It’s a great read. So if you want something gorgeous, funny and heartbreaking (borrowing it again from Ms. Oliver) then you should not miss this one! Charmingly awesome!

← Previously

Top